Sunday Times Books LIVE Community Sign up

Login to Sunday Times Books LIVE

Forgotten password?

Forgotten your password?

Enter your username or email address and we'll send you reset instructions

Sunday Times Books LIVE

Jonathan Ball

@ Sunday Times Books LIVE

Andrew Lamprecht’s Tretchikoff: The People’s Painter Launched at the Book Lounge

Natasha Swift & Andrew Lamprecht

TretchikoffThe launch of Tretchikoff: The People’s Painter at the Book Lounge earlier this week offered art fundis and aficionados a splendid opportunity to witness art critic Lloyd Pollak at his tetchy cantankerous best jousting with the book’s editor, the implacable and assured Andrew Lamprecht. Present in the audience was Tretchikoff’s granddaughter, Natasha Swift, who directs the Tretchikoff Foundation.

Lamprecht recalled receiving Swift’s invitation to curate the exhibition and explained his motivation for undertaking the project. “I’d known of Tretchikoff my whole life, some of my earliest memories are of watching programmes about him on TV as a child, I’d even met him once. He was a sort of spectre that loomed in the South African art world, larger than life. He was always around, there were always stories about him.”

But for all the dozen or more conversations about Tretchikoff he’d been part of, when he started doing some research into the artist’s life and work, Lamprecht discovered how little he really knew about the artist. “I had an idea I knew so much about him but in fact I’d seen a couple of faded prints, read some newspaper articles and watched some badly remembered TV documentaries. The problem with Tretchikoff is that people know him secondhand – through prints, through hearsay and anecdotes, through rumour. I was interested in looking at this artist in a deeper way,” said the curator and editor of companion book.

Lamprecht elected to curate the exhibition on condition that there were funds available to show the original works. He wanted to see if there was a difference between the prints and the orginals. This was, coincidentally, shortly after Brett Kebble’s fake “Lost Orchid” was auctioned.

He said, “It struck me that very little or no academic or art historical research had been done on his work. I suspected that this contributed to the mistake that was made at the auction. Despite a couple of lavishly illustrated books gathering dust on library shelves, there was no up to date scholarship or engagement with his work. I wanted a retrospective work that included originals and had a scholarly basis”.

Here are some live Tweets from the launch:


#livebooks Lamprecht: Tretchikoff was a spectre that loomed on landscape during my childhood but knew only his prints and had read articles.less than a minute ago via Twitter for iPad Favorite Retweet Reply


#livebooks T’s wealth accrued to him through sale of prints. Pollack scathing about T’s technique. Suggests comparison of print & original.less than a minute ago via Twitter for iPad Favorite Retweet Reply


#livebooks Lamprecht says 250k saw originals at Harrods & bought prints to take home. Reproductions hung on mantlepieces all over the world.less than a minute ago via Twitter for iPad Favorite Retweet Reply


#livebooks Tretchikoff said the critics were clowns. They made him laugh, all the way to the bank. He appeals to the “visually uneducated”.less than a minute ago via Twitter for iPad Favorite Retweet Reply


#livebooks Technology had moved on in print technique, but aura of artist remained in notion of print. He used process of mass technology.less than a minute ago via Twitter for iPad Favorite Retweet Reply


#livebooks Lamprecht chose essayists who don’t usually write about art to avoid repetition of tired views & reductions.less than a minute ago via Twitter for iPad Favorite Retweet Reply

Facebook gallery

FacebookFacebook

Book details

 

Please register or log in to comment